Will writing: when it's too late, it really is too late!

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A majority of adults still haven't made a Will! Here are the stats...

Over half of the UK’s adult population have not written a will, so storing up problems and stresses for their families when they die.

And, if you’re one of the majority without a will, you don’t have a choice over who gets your money.  Not what you want? Right, so don’t put it off any longer, for once it’s too late, it really is too late.  

It won't be you who faces the consequences of dying without a will - it will be your family and other potential beneficiaries. We all have a responsibility to make sure our affairs are neatly tied up in advance - why make a difficult time even more difficult?

As well as wanting to do the right thing for your loved ones, there are obvious events which should trigger you to write your Will. These include getting married; having a child; buying a property; inheriting money; a serious illness...

This table, from unbiased*, shows the percentage of UK adults without a will: 

Age

2013

2014

2015

20 – 29

83%

84%

87%

30 – 39 

80%

78%

76%

40 – 49

69%

68%

65%

50 – 59

54%

54%

59%

60 – 69

27%

27%

31%

Over 70

19%

15%

18%

 

 

Tags: dying Will writing Probate Wills

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